Too Much

Ever had so much to do that you just can’t motivate?

That’s so where I am right now.  Feeling blah, and enervated.

And I can’t seem to get excited about anything, including the blogsurfing I’ve been doing for the last 45 minutes.

And there were some blogs to get excited about, too: Gooseberried, Michelle & the City. Good stuff. But I have to wonder because they’re getting around 40 comments per post, so it really feels that my linking to them would be superfluous. Thanks, Hank. Thanks for nothin’.

Then I remember (that is, just now, as I wrote that little piece of depression-on-a-stick) that at the battle of Marathon—this is the Athenians against the Persians—in the 5th Century BCE, on the eve of the battle, little Plataea sent aid. In a battle of 10,000 Athenians against 250,000 Persians, Plataea sent 1,000 men. Athens had aided them once before, and this was a thank you. They arrived on the eve of battle.

Can you imagine the morale boost? Athens stood alone. Against Darius, King of Persia. A king who had known only victory, and conquered everything he desired. 10,000 against 250,000 (and that’s a conservative number). Sparta wouldn’t send help (for weirdo reasons), no one else would go against Darius. This was a battle that would decide the fate of Western civilization. If Darius defeated Athens, there would be no stopping a sweep through the Med and Western Europe. No one could stop them. Syracuse wasn’t powerful enough. Sparta wasn’t.  Rome, then, wasn’t.

And on the eve of battle, 1,000 Plataeans show up. Athens wasn’t alone. To the battle itself, the Plataeans didn’t matter. They weren’t as well trained as the Athenians. Nor likely were they as well armed. But the symbolism!

And after Athens won? (n.b. After the battle, the Persians got on their boats and, realizing that with the Athenian army at Marathon, that Athens itself was open to attack, sailed toward Athens. The Athenian army ran from Marathon back to Athens. When the Persians arrived, they found the Athenians guarding the city, and sailed home in defeat. Which is where we get the concept of a marathon race, though Marathon is closer to 20 miles from Athens than 26.2.)

After Athens won, they protected Plataea from then on. No one could challenge Plataea’s independence without Athens rising to protect it.

So go read Michelle & the City. She’s funny. And even if I only send her two visitors, maybe she’ll protect me from rampaging Persians sometime in the future.  And while you’re at it, read Gooseberried, too.

Stranger things have happened.

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5 responses to “Too Much

  1. Haha! Thanks for the linkage. I by far don’t get 40 comments! That would make me famous or something like the other Michelle you linked.

    You might have seen me comment on Melina’s blog because I love Melina and hope to marry her one day. But, I’m commented on your blog several times before too, so it might have been that. You’ve been on my google reader for a while now.

    Yay, blogosphere and stuff!

    P.S. Love the photos!

  2. I so feel you about the 40 comment thing. I’m proud of the 4 I get! hee hee.

    And thanks for the history lesson… I feel smarter today. 🙂

  3. I feel ya on the lack of motivation. When I can’t get motivated to read blogs, then I know there is something wrong.

  4. Part of it is that I don’t get enough sleep. I’m going to sue Apple: they made my new 24″ iMac so enticing that I can’t stop using it. I just keep playing around, watching iTunes TV shows and movies on it, surfing the net on that gorgeous screen, until 1:30-2:00am.

    They should have put a warning label on there or something.

    I’m just sayin’.

  5. Well maybe there is some fun reading on my blog? No? Oh well 😉

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